Dalai Lama

Dalai Lama

SKU: dalailama

Dalai Lama is a title given to spiritual leaders of the Tibetan people. They are monks of the Gelug or "Yellow Hat" school of Tibetan Buddhism, the newest of the schools of Tibetan Buddhism founded by Je Tsongkhapa. The Dalai Lama title was created by Altan Khan, the Prince of Shunyi, granted by Ming Dynasty, in 1578. The 14th and current Dalai Lama is Tenzin Gyatso.

The Dalai Lama has always been an important figure of the Gelug tradition. Although finding dominance in Central Tibet, the Dalai Lama has been an important figure beyond sectarian boundaries. The Dalai Lama figure is important for many reasons. Since the time of the fifth Dalai Lama his personage has always been a symbol of unification of the state of Tibet, where he has represented Buddhist values and traditions.[9] This is significant, even though he had no formal or institutional roles in any religious tradition. He has tried to demonstrate that the Buddhist values and traditions should be placed above the importance of any specific school. The traditional function of the Dalai Lama as an ecumenical figure, holding together disparate religious and regional groups, has been taken up by the present fourteenth Dalai Lama. He has worked to overcome sectarian and other divisions in the exiled community and has become a symbol of Tibetan nationhood for Tibetans both in Tibet and in exile..

The Dalai Lama is considered to be the successor in a line of tulkus (living Buddhas, masters) who are believed to be incarnations of Avalokiteśvara, the Bodhisattva of Compassion, called Chenrezig in Tibetan. The name is a combination of the Mongolic word dalai meaning "ocean" or "big" (coming from Mongolian title Dalaiyin qan or Dalaiin khan, translated as 'Gyatso' in Tibetan) and the Tibetan word བླ་མ་ (bla-ma) meaning "master, guru".

The Dalai Lama was an important figure of the Geiuk tradition, which was politically and numerically dominant in Central Tibet, but his religious authority went beyond sectarian boundaries. While he had no formal or institutional role in each religious tradition, which was headed by its own high lamas, he was a unifying symbol of the Tibetan state, representing Buddhist values and traditions above any specific school.

From 1642 until 1705, and from 1750 to the 1950s, the Dalai Lamas or their regents headed the Tibetan government (or Ganden Phodrang) in Lhasa which governed all or most of the Tibetan plateau with varying degrees of autonomy under the Qing Dynasty of China, up to complete sovereignty, which was rejected by both the People's Republic of China and Republic of China.[19] This Tibetan government also enjoyed the patronage and protection of firstly Mongol kings of the Khoshut and Dzungar Khanates (1642–1720) and then of the emperors of the Manchu-led Qing dynasty (1720–1912).

  • PRODUCT INFO

    Finer selected 11" x 14" frames, hand assembled and matted down to 8" x 10" that will demand attention in any man cave or she-shed.

  • RETURN AND REFUND POLICY

    All sales are final.

  • Specs

    Fine 11 x 14 Frame matted to an 8 x 10 memory that will demand attention in any Man Cave, office or even She Shed.

$75 Regular Price
$40Sale Price
0

© 2017 by MAN CAVE WALL ART: A BV INNOVATIVE INVESTMENT COMPANY | DESIGN BY: CREATIVE APE STUDIO